Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘wool’

I’m really digging the simplicity of these ties. 100% virgin wool, handmade in California.

They look to be somewhere around the 2.25″-2.5″ territory at the widest point. If it’s nearer to the lower end of that spectrum, they might actually be a bit too slim for my tastes.  I’m hoping that’s not the case, though. Because with a $58 price tag–and a really spot on olive green version available–I want one.

Aside from the aforementioned olive, Apolis has navy and charcoal options on offer. There’s also a black version, but it’s currently sold out. Maybe they’ll restock.

Available at Apolis Activism’s online shop.

—Jonathan

(Images courtesy of Apolis Activism)

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

image

Robert Geller’s winter offerings have hit the shelves (at least the digital ones) at Vancouver’s Roden Gray, and this subtlely two-toned melton wool peacoat immediately caught my eye.

There’s not a lot that needs to be said about this one other than noting that it’s designed in NYC, made in Japan, and a pretty damn handsome twist on the cold weather staple. Also, despite the label, it’s actually attainable (if not exactly economical) at $368 CAD.

If you’re shopping for (or are) a peacoat fan that’s already covered the basics, it’s a solid option. Hell, it’s such an understated tweak and such a classic shape that you could probably skip the standard issue fare and use this as the go-to if you’re so inclined.

—Jonathan

(Image courtesy of Roden Gray)

Read Full Post »

When I first heard about the Americana-gasm of the Levi’s x Pendleton collaboration that hit stores this past Tuesday, I was pretty damn excited. Levi’s recent work with Filson proved (to me at least) that the jeans mega-brand is more than capable of playing nice with others and creating some interesting tweaks on designs using key elements from both parties. Crucially, it also illustrated the fact that Levi’s-proper (not just imprints like LVC) can still make a well-constructed product with quality materials once those dollars tick a bit higher.

That last point is probably the most important to me, as I’ve run into my fair share of issues with fabrics in the main line. It’s especially pertinent because two of the three pieces of actual men’s apparel (there’s also a blanket but I don’t really count that) are takes on the iconic trucker jacket, which I’ve always loved but never purchased due to questionable textiles and sometimes-shoddy construction. But a group of goods made in the US? All featuring Pendleton’s virgin wool in an exclusive jacquard print (using blues, golds, and a bit of red to recall denim, contrast stitching, and red selvage in well-worn jeans) and one with denim from Cone Mills? Salvation at long last! At least, that was the initial reaction.

I was partly right. The rigid Work Shirt ain’t half bad, and the wool-yoked Western Trucker did not fail to impress. The Blanket Lined Trucker though? Not my my cup of tea, not really on par with the other pieces, and pretty disappointing overall.

Let’s break it down one by one.

The Good: The Work Shirt ($118)

Done in a rigid, deep indigo denim with a subtle greycast, it’s a pretty solid example of the breed. The fabric is suitably heavy duty, and the cut is trim in spirit but sized up enough that it can function as an overshirt. In terms of details you’ve got two button-through chest pockets, a box pleat at the back, a tab collar, thick wooden buttons, and of course the iconic red tab on the chest. And then there’s the Pendleton portion: paneling on the back yoke and on the back of the forearms. Nothing flashy, and it works well.

The Bad: The Blanket Lined Trucker ($178)

Considering the fact that there’s a complimentary women’s version, it seems that the Blanket Lined Trucker is supposed to be the shining jewel of the collection. And the Pendleton vest lining, which buttons in and out with some particularly handsome painted buttons, is pretty damn nice. It’s soft, fitted, and warm. But the jacket itself isn’t anything special. The denim itself felt somewhat overprocessed and insubstantial, and the look overall is just “meh.” It’s not a total failing, but it’s not a winner. I suppose you can’t win ’em all…

The Winner: The Western Trucker

But some can be a winner.  And in this bunch, it’s definitely the Western Trucker. Made of rigid Cone denim and featuring Pendletone panels on the yoke and lining the cuffs, it’s a very solid combination on the textile front. The quality of the wool is a given at this point, but it was really nice to see Levi’s step up the game on the denim. Heavy and rigid without being artificially stiff, it feels like it’ll wear like iron. Add the tried and true trucker styling to the mix and that’s really all you need.

As you can see, the Western Trucker wasn’t shot in a Levi’s store like the other two pieces. I decided to pick one up for myself after checking it out, so that backdrop is my apartment.

Whether I’m going to wind up keeping it, though, is another matter. The reason being, it’s kinda tough to work wool jacquard paneling on outerwear into my wardrobe mix, even when it’s a solid and relatively understated one. Despite that tredipidation, it’s still in my place. So we’ll see where that one lands…

All the pieces (as well as the unmentioned-here blanket) are available online through Levi’s and Pendleton’s sites, and in Levi’s stores.

—Jonathan

Read Full Post »

image

It’s pretty clear at this point that Bridge & Burn is a label that I’m quite fond of, so I’ll spare you any long winded meditations in favor of putting out the word (albeit a little late) that they have three new coats available for winter.

My personal favorite is the Major Major (the first image in this post), an update of a style from last spring that’s been reworked in a heavy wool with a quilted satin lining. With the hood, shirttail inspired scooped hem, and slightly off-kilter pocket formation, it caught my eye when it first hit in the original cotton iteration. Seeing it reworked in a more winter-ready version is a welcome development.

There’s also the Berthoud, a longer jacket with five front pockets and a black/red checked lining. Featuring a covert cuff system with ribbed, knitted cuffs tucked inside the sleeve, it looks mighty toasty.

image

image

But the Berthoud isn’t the absolute toastiest. That honor falls to the Fraser, a heavy duty interpretation of a vintage Sweedish military piece, according to friend of the blog/Bridge & Burn owner and designer Erik Prowell. So: straight from the horse’s mouth, as it were. Even though I haven’t worn it, I’m going to take him at his word when he says it’s the warmest of the bunch.

image

image

image

All three are currently available online, and prices hit at a pretty-darn-reasonable $250-$290.

—Jonathan

(Images courtesy of Bridge & Burn)

Read Full Post »

image

image

Today was the first time this Fall that I can remember noticing, accutely and immediately, the chill in the air as I made my way out of the homestead to start the day. A great time, then, to have these couple of shirts from Pendleton hit my radar thanks to Blackbird.

The Solo Shirt is a classic dress shirt done in a slim silhouette (or “Vintage Fit” in the label’s own parlence), and made of soft, machine-washable virgin wool from Pendleton’s mill in Oregon. Details are simple: a single chest pocket, single button cuffs, scooped hemline, and a seven-button front placket. Nothing fancy, but I’m thankful for it because it lets the fabric shine through.

image

image

image

image

And with a beautifully muted brown/burgundy/navy ombre as well as a more vibrant green Buchanan tartan on offer, the fabric really does deserve its place as the star of the show. Not a shocker in the least, considering wool is what Pendleton is all about, but well appreciated all the same.

One thing that is a little surprising? The price. Clocking in at $98 a pop, these shirts are pretty damn affordable for what they are. That pricetag is achieved through a bit of outsourcing, though. While sourced from US components, they’re put together in Mexico. I know that’s a dealbreaker for some, a total non-issue for others, and somewhere in between for the rest. Take it is you see fit.

image

image

image

image

Both options are available online, and they’re sure to move fast. If you’re looking to score one for yourself, be it brown or Buchanan, get on it quick.

—Jonathan

(Images courtesy of Blackbird)

Read Full Post »

I’m a big fan of work jackets in theory, but in practice I’ve often hit a stumbling block when it comes to this particular style of outerwear. A lot of the work jackets on my radar tend to stay very true to the name. They’re designed for real work, or at least they take their cues from that heritage. And that tends to translate to boxy, roomy fits (for ease of movement and layering), and super-heavy duty materials (for durability).

While this is fantastic for folks who are actually doing hard work in their jackets (I’m thinking chopping wood-style, sweat of your brow type stuff here), it’s kind of unnecessary for the folks that aren’t. And with my urban-dwelling, office-job-working lifestyle…well, I ain’t exactly chopping much wood.

S.E.H Kelly‘s take on the work jacket, though, is something that I could actually wear without verging into workwear-poseur territory. It’s slimmed down and dressed up a bit in either charcoal gray wool/cashmere or French navy cotton twill. The sort of piece that’s not really meant for hard labor, and would probably be more at home with “gentleman’s chores.” Tasks like minding the study, refilling the brandy snifters, waxing philosophical. That sort of thing.

Ok, not that sort of thing exactly. But hoofing it through the city on your way to the office on a brisk autumn day? I think it’d hold up to that sort of work quite nicely.

True to the brand’s philosophy, both the charcoal and navy versions of the jacket are made in England with components sourced from the British Isles. They feature a turn-down point collar, as well as double patch pockets on the exterior with fold-over detailing and wool melton lining. There’s also an interior patch pocket with a pencil slot. As a devoted user of the interior pockets on jackets (my phone usually lives there throughout the Fall/Winter), this is a massive bonus in my book.

The French navy iteration is made from heavyweight cotton twill from a family-run mill in Lancashire and has black Corozo buttons, while the Charcoal take is a 95/5 flecked wool/cashmere blend from Cotswolds with buttons made from tortoiseshell English horn.

I honestly can’t pick a favorite.

Both are available from S.E.H Kelly’s online shop. The French navy cotton twill is £230, and the charcoal wool/cashmere will run you £310.

If you’ve got studies to mind and snifters to fill–and even if you don’t–it’s as good a time as any to get to work.

—Jonathan

(Images courtesy of S.E.H Kelly)

Read Full Post »

image

Despite the persistence of balmy weather at the moment, there’s no denying the fact that the cold is coming. And it’s not all that far off.

In the interest of readiness for the near-future, now’s a pretty good time to snag a couple of pairs of decent wool socks. They’re an easy, inexpensive way to dial up the comfort factor during the late fall, on through the winter, and into early spring. When it’s freezing cold outside, toasty warm socks go a long way towards increasing general happiness and maintaining a comfortable core temperature. A great deal of body heat can be lost where skin is thin: the wrists, top of your head, around the neck, and (yep) the ankles.

These Billy Reid 100% worsted wool socks have already gotten some love in the blogoverse (from friends of the blog Paul and Nico), but I thought I’d give ’em some coverage nonetheless. They’re classically good-looking, sturdy, and very fairly priced at $16 per pair. They even feature a reinforced heel and toe for added durability.

Available in three color combos: beige/red, beige/black/red, and navy/red (my personal favorite).

image

image

image

image

A nice bonus? Sure! If you pick ’em up in the online store before October 31st and use the code HOSPITALITY at checkout, there’s a 20% discount and shipping is free. That works out to $12.80 a pair. Not bad.

Get on it.

—Jonathan

(Images courtesy of Billy Reid)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »